Bluejacking

ABSTRACT

Bluejacking is the sending of unsolicited messages over Bluetooth to Bluetooth-enabled devices such as mobile phones, PDAs or laptop computers, sending a vCard which typically contains a message in the name field (i.e. for bluedating or bluechat) to another Bluetooth enabled device via the OBEX protocol. Bluetooth has a very limited range; usually around 10 meters on mobile phones, but laptops can reach up to 100 meters with powerful transmitters.

Bluejacking allows phone users to send business cards anonymously using Bluetooth wireless technology. Bluejacking does not involve the removal or alteration of any data from the device. Bluejackers often look for the receiving phone to ping or the user to react. In order to carry out a bluejacking, the sending and receiving devices must be within 10 meters of one another. Phone owners who receive bluejack messages should refuse to add the contacts to their address book. Devices that are set in non-discoverable mode are not susceptible to bluejacking.

Mobile phones have been adopted as an everyday technology, and they are ubiquitous in social situations as users carry them around as they move through different physical locations throughout the day. As a communicative device, the mobile phone has been gradually taken up in ways that move beyond merely providing a channel for mediated conversation. One such appropriation is bluejacking, the practice of sending short, unsolicited messages via vCard functionality to other Bluetooth-enabled phones. To choose the recipients of bluejacks, senders complete a scan using their mobile phones to search for the available Bluetooth-enabled devices in the immediate area. A bluejacker picks one of the available devices, composes a message within a body of the phone’s contact interface, sends the message to the recipient, and remains in the vicinity to observe any reactions expressed by the recipient.

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Skinput

ABSTRACT

Skinput is an input technology that uses bio-acoustics sensing to localize finger taps on the skin. When augmented with a pico projector, the device can provide a direct manipulation, graphical user interface on the body. The technology was developed by Chris Harrison, Desney Tan and Dan Morris at Microsoft Research’s Computational User experience Group.

Skinput represents one way to decouple input from electronic devices with the aim of allowing devices to become smaller without simultaneously shrinking the surface area on which input can be performed. While other systems, like Sixth sense have attempted this with computer vision, Skinput employs acoustics, which take the advantage of the human body’s natural sound conductive properties. This allows the body to be annexed as an input surface without the need for the skin to be invasively instrumented with sensors, tracking, markers, or other items.

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Co-operative Linux

ABSTRACT

This seminar describes Cooperative Linux, a port of the Linux kernel that allows it to run as an unprivileged lightweight virtual machine in kernel mode, on top of another OS kernel. It allows Linux to run under any operating system that supports loading drivers, such as Windows or Linux, after minimal porting efforts. The paper includes the present and future implementation details, its applications, and its comparison with other Linux virtualization methods. Among the technical details, it also presents the CPU-complete context switch code, hardware interrupt forwarding, the interface between the host OS and Linux, and the management of the VM‘s pseudo physical RAM.

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Heliodisplay

ABSTRACT

The Heliodisplay is a free-space display developed by IO2 Technology. A projector is focused onto a layer of mist in mid-air, resulting in a two-dimensional display that appears to float. This is similar in principle to the cinematic technique of rear projection. As dark areas of the image may appear invisible, the image may be more realistic than on a projection screen, although it is still not volumetric. Looking directly at the display, one would also be looking into the projector’s light source. The necessity of an oblique viewing angle (to avoid looking into the projector’s light source) may be a disadvantage. Heliodisplay can work as a free-space touchscreen when connected to a PC by a USB cable. A PC sees the Heliodisplay as a pointing device, like a mouse. With the supplied software installed, one can use a finger, pen, or another object as cursor control and navigate or interact with simple content. The mist is formed by a series of metal plates, and the original Heliodisplay could run for several hours on one litre of tap water. 2008 model Heliodisplays use 80 mml to 120 ml of water per hour, depending on screen size and user settings, and can be built with any size water tank. The Heliodisplay was invented by Chad Dyner, who built it as a five-inch prototype in his apartment before patenting the free-space display technology, and founding IO2 Technology LLC to further develop the product.

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Touch Screens With Feelings

ABSTRACT

This seminar includes the theory, design and construction of a haptic display for creating texture sensations through variations in surface friction. Ultra sonic frequency, low amplitude vibrations between two flat plates have been shown to create a squeeze film of air between the two plate surfaces thereby reducing the friction. Here, it is shown that a reduction of friction will also occur between a human finger and a vibrating plate. Thus, a vibrating plate can serve as a haptic interface. The amplitude of vibration can also be correlated to the amount of friction reduction the plate and the finger. Varying the surface friction between the finger and the haptic interface is a way of indirectly controlling shear forces on the finger during active exploration. Using finger position and velocity feedback on the display allows for the creation of spatial texture sensations.

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Femtocells Technology

ABSTRACT

      Femtocells, a technology little-known outside the wireless world, promise better indoor cellular service. In telecommunication, a Femtocell is a small cellular base station, typically designed for use in a home or small business. It connects to the service provider’s network via broadband. Current designs typically support 2 to 4 active mobile phones in a residential setting, and 8 to 16 active mobile phones in enterprise settings. A Femtocell allows service providers to extend service coverage indoors, especially where access would otherwise be limited or unavailable. For a mobile operator, the attractions of a Femtocell are improvements to both coverage and capacity, especially indoors. This can reduce both capital expenditure and operating expense.

      A Femtocell is typically the size of a residential gateway or smaller, and connects into the end-user’s broadband line. Once plugged in, the Femtocell connects to the MNO’s mobile network, and provides extra coverage in a range of typically 30 to 50 meters for residential Femtocells.

      The end-user must declare which mobile phone numbers are allowed to connect to his/her Femtocell, usually via a web interface provided by the MNO. When these mobile phones arrive under coverage of the Femtocell, they switch over from the Macrocell (outdoor) to the Femtocell automatically. Most MNOs provide means for the end-user to know this has happened, for example by having a different network name appear on the mobile phone. All communications will then automatically go through the Femtocell. When the end-user leaves the Femtocell coverage (whether in a call or not), his phone hands over seamlessly to the macro network.

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Fluorescent Multilayer Disc (FMD)

ABSTRACT

Compact discs were a revolutionary product at its time and influenced many spheres of human activity. People started recording music of high quality, which didn’t get worse with the time as it happens to be on tape. As soon as CDs appeared in computer industry they immediately became an undoubted helper both for users and for programmers. The latter were able to increase volume of their program products by adding video and audio elements etc. Later discs were used for digital video (VideoCD).

But technologies are progressing. Data are growing faster and faster. A usual CD is far not enough (640 MBytes). So, there appeared DVD technology. Of course we are happy with those 17 GBytes that can be kept on one DVD disc, but this is a limiting point. So we need a completely new method of storing information on portable data medium. And at last, the company Constellation 3D demonstrates a new format: FMD (Fluorescent Multilayer Disk), which can provide us with a staggering 140 GB of storage space seems to be an enticing solution for the storage-hungry masses.

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