E-Intelligence

ABSTRACT


E-intelligence systems provide internal business users, trading partners, and corporate clients rapid and easy access to the e-business information, applications, and services they need in order to compete effectively and satisfy customer needs. They offer many business benefits to organizations in exploiting the power of the Internet. For example, e-intelligence systems give the organization the ability to:

1. Integrate e-business operations into the traditional business environment, giving business users a complete view of all corporate business operations and information.

2. Help business users make informed decisions based on accurate and consistent e-business information that is collected and integrated from e-business applications. This business information helps business users optimize Web-based offerings (products offered, pricing and promotions, service and support, and so on) to match marketplace requirements and analyze business performance with respect to competitors and the organization’s business-performance objectives.
3. Assist e-business applications in profiling and segmenting e-business customers. Based on this information, businesses can personalize their Web pages and the products and services they offer.
4. Extend the business intelligence environment outside the corporate firewall, helping the organization share internal business information with trading partners. Sharing this information will let it optimize the product supply chain to match the demand for products sold through the Internet and minimizes the costs of maintaining inventory.

5. Extend the business intelligence environment outside the corporate firewall to key corporate clients, giving them access to business information about their accounts.
With this information, clients can analyze and tune their business relationships with other organization, improving client service and satisfaction.

6. Link e-business applications with business intelligence and collaborative processing applications, allowing internal and external users to seamlessly move among different systems.



If you are you interested in this seminar topic, mail to us to get
the full report * of the seminar topic.
Mail ID: - contact4seminars@gmail.com 
* conditions apply

– OR –

Click here for Quick Contact (Request for Topics)



WiMAX

ABSTRACT


WiMAX, meaning Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access, is a telecommunications technology that provides wireless transmission of data using a variety of transmission modes, from point-to-point links to portable internet access[citation needed]. The technology provides up to 75 Mbit/s symmetric broadband speed without the need for cables. The technology is based on the IEEE 802.16 standard (also called Broadband Wireless Access). The name “WiMAX” was created by the WiMAX Forum, which was formed in June 2001 to promote conformity and interoperability of the standard. The forum describes WiMAX as “a standards-based technology enabling the delivery of last mile wireless broadband access as an alternative to cable and DSL”.
The terms “fixed WiMAX”, “mobile WiMAX”, “802.16d” and “802.16e” are frequently used incorrectly Correct definitions are the following:
• 802.16-2004 is often called 802.16d, since that was the working party that developed the standard. It is also frequently referred to as “fixed WiMAX” since it has no support for mobility.
• 802.16e-2005 is an amendment to 802.16-2004 and is often referred to in shortened form as 802.16e. It introduced support for mobility, amongst other things and is therefore also known as “mobile WiMAX”.



If you are you interested in this seminar topic, mail to us to get
the full report * of the seminar topic.
Mail ID: - contact4seminars@gmail.com
* conditions apply

– OR –

Click here for Quick Contact (Request for Topics)



Reconstruction of Recorded Sound

ABSTRACT


Bulk of recorded sound history the audio information was stored in mechanical media, such as a phonograph record or wax cylinder, via undulated surface incisions (grooves). The grooves’ shape and position can be reconstructed without mechanical contact by using precision optical metrology tools. The surface map thus obtained can be digitally processed further to remove noise artifacts due to damage and wear, and to convert the groove positional information into audio format. The viability of this approach was recently demonstrated on a 78 rpm shellac disc using two dimensional image capture and analysis methods. The present work expands on these results. A three dimensional reconstruction of mechanically recorded sound is reported. The surface of the source material, a wax cylinder, was scanned using co focal microscopy techniques and resulted in a faithful playback of the recorded information. The approach holds promise for careful reconstruction of valuable historical recording using full surface information to improve the sound fidelity, as well as means of automated mass digitization. Fast processing is required for the latter application. Methods to accelerate the scan rates, thereby making these techniques practical for use in working archives, are reported.



If you are you interested in this seminar topic, mail to us to get
the full report * of the seminar topic.
Mail ID: - contact4seminars@gmail.com
* conditions apply

– OR –

Click here for Quick Contact (Request for Topics)



  • © 2008 – 2013 seminars4you,

  • All rights reserved.